Tag Archives: Zeus

Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: December 4: Pallas Athena

Greeks had a Goddess who stood for wisdom and represented the Arts. Two things which was very important to their culture. A daughter of the Great and almighty Zeus, Athena was her name.  Considered to be Daddy’s favorite girl, Athena didn’t have your everyday, typical birth. Instead of being born of a woman, since Zeus swallowed up her mother, Athena was instead, born from the splitting open of Zeus’s skull. No worries, Zeus survived.

In classical Greece, a festival called, Pallas Athena, would have been held honoring the Goddess.

Ancient Calendar& Pagan Holidays: July 19: Adonis & an Egyptian New Year

Adonis was the beloved of Aphrodite. However, during a hunting accident, he was killed by a boar. Aphrodite lost her mind over this, as any lover would. So, pleading and begging Zeus to return him, he compromised. Waving his Godly hand, or however them Gods there do it, *winks* he made it so that Adonis would spend half the year in the light with Aphrodite, and the other half in the darkness of the Underworld with Persephone. So today, in Ancient Greek calendar, Adonis’s travels would mark the mid point of the half year.

 

 

In Egypt, This would have been the New year, but also the wedding anniversary of our dearest Isis and Osiris. How neat is that?

 

 

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Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: June 14th: Physical & Symbolic Doors to New Things and Other Dimensions, New Runic Half-Month, A Son of Odin and an Epic Song of Muses

Excitingly, we have a new Runic Half-Month beginning today that our present day Pagans who follow such paths may find interesting. This one is called Dag and it will run from June 14th – June 28th. Dag means day and it stands for opening new doors to new things. Now, if I may draw your attention to the Celtic Tree Month which is going on right now that is called Duir. It’s the seventh month but more importantly, is the great Oak tree. I bring this up because the Oak was a very powerful tree according to Druid belief. An Oak was a “door” to another dimension.

So for all my living Pagans out there, maybe you may find a link between the Rune Dag, which means opening a new door and that of the Celtic Month, Duir, which is an actual door.

A bit more on Dag, as I said above, it means Day. And what does Day symbolized? Light. This is a time of shaping the coming year, of good health and a time to prosper. Throwing light on things, new opportunities, relationships….remember, opening doors does not have to be a physical action. It can also be symbolic.


Skipping off into the Ancient World, now, we take a look at one of Odin’s sons, Vidar. This one happened to stand for stealth and revenge — two things every Norseman needed at some point or another.

Now, The Norse hold this day sacred to Vidar for good reason. He happens to have a part to play in the foretold prophecy of Radnarok. See, during Radnarok, a wolf named Fenris will break its leash. The blood of Odin is on this beast’s mind. It is foretold, though, that Vadir will slay the wolf but not before Fenris kills Odin. Like any good son would, Vadir will rule earth in place of his father, or at least that’s how the story goes.


Over in Greece, it is written that Zeus has nine daughters. Each one had a talent for something — something the Greeks enjoyed immensely– whether that something was art, song, history, tragedy, comedy, dancing and so on. These women became known as the Nine Muses which was said to inspire us all. Even today, we use the term, whether we are writing or painting or doing whatever it is we do. We either claim our Muse has possessed or inspire us or, we desperately beg for one of our Muses to. If you love to pay homage to the Muses, well today is your lucky day. Wish them a Happy Birthday and maybe, just maybe, a Muse will smile down on you.


Ancient Calendar: June 12, 2010

 

 

All those in classical Greece would have placed Oak leaves on their body in some way on this day in Ancient History. They did this to honor Zeus.

In Egypt, they would have been having a festival for the Goddess Mut who happened to be Amun’s wife.

Once the sun went down over in the Land of the Welsh, a great feast would have been thrown for Epona which was their divinity linked to horses and fertility. The evening would have been called Gwyl o Epona.

 

And we say good-bye to the Goddess Month of Hera for it now comes to an end. Hera, being the so-called jealous wife of Zeus—since he couldn’t keep from messin’ around.

However, with a little research, I dug up some things not so common in popular myth.

Hera, believed to be the same as earlier Goddesses predating Gods, was believed to have originated in early Aegean civilizations (along with Rhea–pre Hellenic).

Queens who ruled by her name, carried the title Hiera "Holy One."

According to Barbara G. Walkers "The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths & Secrets", Hera was originally the Mother of the Gods, subordinate to no one, and a Great mother who made kings AND gods. In fact, Zeus was not as ancient as she, but that would be changed once writers began to pen something different.

It wasn’t until Greek Authors attempted to make a male deity older and stronger—Zeus, that Hera became a jealous wife and woman. The arguing between Hera and Zeus seems to be symbolic of the arguing between the cults of that time–patriarchal & matriarchal–who battled over the truths of Hera and of other gods & goddesses.

As a trinity, she was Hera, Hebe, and Hecate. (Representing the moons–New, full, and old– Virgin of Spring, Mother of Summer, destroying Crone of Autumn.

Hera spread through Europe and even the Saxon’s made worship of her at Heresburg (Hera’s Mount) known to be the phallic column of the world.

Some sources claim Hera’s name may have meant He Era, the earth.

 

C.H. Scarlett

www.chscarlett.net