Tag Archives: YA

Books for young Pagans

Here’s a few recommended reads for young pagans. These are all books I’ve read, and that have pagan themes, suitable for YA readers and good for kids who exploring paganism. These stories offer characters to identify with, and good pagan representation, or draw on pagan myths. Please do add more suggestions!

Witch Child – by Celia Rees. Historical setting, Puritan American settlement, beautiful writing and good witchy representations.

The Sun Miners – Kevan Manwaring – fantasy setting, heroic, and with good underpinning philosophy.

Runemarks – Joanne Harris – Norse inspired, drawing on myths, lively adventure.

The Wierdstone of Brisingamen and The Moon of Gomrath, Elidor – Alan Garner… much mythical underpinning to these, good stories.

The Owl Service – Alan Garner – draws on the tale of Blodeuwedd and is an excellent way into the mabinogian.

The Way of Wyrd – Brian Baters – perhaps for slightly older kids, this is an excellent portrayal of things Heathen.

Stag Boy – William Rayner. A mystical tale, a touch shamanic, melancholy and beautiful.

The Vision of Stephen – Lolah Burford. It was a while ago that I read this, but I recall that karma/reincarnation seemed to play a part, and it’s a rather haunting story.

Ice is Coming – Patricia Wrightson – another one I loved as a child. Much Australian mythology at play in this one.

I’d also recommend any of the Terry Pratchett witches books. I think Pratchett is one of the best authors for depicting witchcraft and magic. He does it in a fantasy setting, but with remarkable insight.

Book Review: Apollo Weeps & Generational by Lizz Clements

Title: Apollo Weeps ISBN 978-0-557-13752-7

Generational  ISBN 978-0-557-10063-7

Author: Lizz Clements

Author Site

Buy Link

Publisher: Lulu

Genre: Poetry, Non-fiction

Length – # OF PAGES:

Apollo Weeps: 113

Generational: 72

Other: Suitable for Young Adults

Pagan & Pagan Elements: Yes/Yes

Card Rating: – 4 Tarots for both

Reviewed by: Brew-Hilda

Excerpt From Apollo Weeps

9780557137527

“Apollo Weeps”
Apollo in his chariot
He of golden rays
Once rode through
The sky so blue
In older, earlier days
But now the boy cannot be found
He hides his gentle face
His eyes are red
His bones not fed
Hanging his head in disgrace
The smile he wore so long ago
Wants so much to return
But all the joy
He had as a boy
Is not so easily earned
Apollo knows there is no chance
No one asks his favor
And those who do
Are less than true
It’s not insight they favor
The boy god cries alone at night
I hear him as I sleep
He knows as I
This world’s a lie
In the darkness we both weep
Apollo, I know that it hurts
It’s true what we both dread
Rhyme has been whored
The bard ignored
The art of poetry is dead

Excerpt From Generational

Untitled

Generational
What’s with these kids today?
Is it me or are they strange?
It doesn’t seem they know the way
They can’t see they have to change
What’s with these kids today?
With their purple hair and eyes
What do they expect me to say
To interracial couples living happy lives?
It must be generational
More than just sensational
Or just irrational
It’s just generational
What’s with these kids today,
With their co-dependent ties?
Do Christian youths think it’s okay
To marry Pagans with sinful lives?
Do teens think it’s okay
To ignore people’s frailties?
That work can still mean less than play
That adults will like their oddities?
It must be generational
More than just sensational
Or just irrational
It’s just generational
I can’t begin to fathom why
They think they’ll be young forever
When all around them people die
And inflict in each other terror.
We must have raised each of them wrong
And pampered them simply too much
Their unity’s naively strong
They have no prejudice and such.
The fact is that they just don’t care
They’re too loving and accepting
Oh, and God, that damn purple hair
Their whole lifestyle’s worth rejecting
It must be generational
And I hope they’re happy there
It’s more than just sensational
They’re brainwashed without a care
Of course it’s all irrational
They’re slaves to living their own way
It hope it’s generational
So it’ll be put to rest someday.

About The Books & Review:

I am doing both reviews in one because I felt the books were somehow linked…maybe because of the not so long ago between the pages in the Author’s life or time frame. Although it should be noted that one book isn’t needed to understand the other. Both, just being written when the author was young.

Both books are filled with Poems written during the time that the Author was young and filled with youth. (That’s not to say they aren’t feeling sprite-ful now. In fact, I have no idea.) However, when reading poetry, a few things can happen. One, you are bored to death and decide to hate poetry forever. Two, you can relate to the poem or at least draw your own meaning. And three, be swept away by words that require deep understanding and feel either partially educated or enlightened by it all afterwards.

Number One will not apply to this book at all to readers who do have a deep love of Poetry already. In fact, I believe books like this are wonderful to read to our children or grandchildren. I think it may awaken something inside them and this book, Apollo’ Weeps seems like a great candidate for that.

I think generational would be eaten up by most Teens today simply because how the author seen magic then, is how most young ones still view it.

For the teen or young adult– perhaps they will also relate to this because at the time this was written, the Author was not far from being one herself.

Taken from Apollo Weeps:

This book can be considered a sequel, though there is no plot
exactly or even a storyline. Its predecessor, Generational (originally
entitled Car Chases & Fake Bologna), was my first “real book.” It was
also my first collection of poetry. It contained a handful of
humorous, contemplative, and irreverent diary entries, respectively.
In essence, Generational chronicled five years of my life, from just
before I started high school until shortly after graduation. The
“stories” are the poems and entries themselves, as they are the
result of my day-to-day existence. The plot is my life, and the
setting is as I live it.

The Review:

Pagan Elements: Yes for both & the Author is Pagan

Cover (Rated 1-10): 4 for Apollo Weeps

8 for Generational –I think teens will relate more to this cover

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Disclaimer: Due to FTC regulations, any book reviewed on this site was sent for free by the author to The Pagan & the Pen. We are not paid to give reviews by Author or Publisher. Once review has been made, said books are deleted.

Pagan YA Fiction

One of the questons I’ve most frequently been asked is whether I can recomend suitable fiction for youg people who are involved with paganism. So, here’s a list of books to suit young adult readers (eight upwards). These are all books I have read and enjoyed, that are well written, and help to place a young reader in their own pagan context. These books draw on pagan themes and some may inspire readers to seek out the original myths.

Alan Garner’s books are excellent. The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, The Moon of Gomrath and Elidor are all good. My favourite is The Owl Service, which should (I think) be accompanied by Kevin Crossley Holland’s retelling of the Mabinogian – very accessible, and after Garner’s intruduction to Blodeuwedd, its necessary reading.

Witch Child, by Celia Rees is a beautifully written tale, perfect for a young witchy girl, but with wider appeal as well. There is a sequel I think, although I’ve not read it.

The Green Man – tales from the mythic forest, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Winding is suitable for slightly older readers. Its a collection full of magic, mystery, pagan gods and forest power.

The Sunminers, Kevan Manwaring (available from www.lulu.com) is mythic, full of relevant themes, and will introduce younger readers to a man whose adult fiction they will want to explore later on! I’m a big fan of Kevan’s.

Tales of the Celtic Bards – Claire Hammilton – again this is one for slightly older YAs, but once they have a taste for myth and legend, this is a good book to pick up – accessbile and beautifully crafted, it makes some of the key Celtic stories available.

I would also suggest Brian Bates The Way of Wyrd. It’s a more grown up book, I was about 11 when I read it – and it affected me deeply.

Happy reading! If you can, find an opportunity to hear storytellers as well. The sharing of stories used to be about oral communication, in person and that’s a radically different, and very powerful experience.