Tag Archives: Spells

Cursing, Hexing, Bottling and Binding

Pagan Portals

By Spellbook & Candle: Cursing, Hexing, Bottling and Binding

The subject of cursing is something that crops up quite frequently on social media, usually in the context of whether it’s ever justified.  Plus the endless compendiums of superstition and folklore contain endless charms, talismans and amulets for protection against the witches’ curse.  So, let’s put the subject into some form of perspective:

Curses have given the world its greatest stories, and the more grisly and gory, the better we like them. But cursing, or ill-wishing, is not confined to magical practitioners – black, white or

grey – it is a form of expression intended to do harm in reparation for some real or imagined insult. And can be ‘thrown’ by anyone of any race, culture or creed without any prior experience of ritual magic or witchcraft.

Curses have also been taken seriously in literature. In Phases in the Religion of Ancient Rome, we discover that Roman poets Ovid and Horace recorded all manner of cursing in their writings. Or the most famous (albeit apocryphal) – that of the last Grand Master of the Knights Templar, which inspired six dramatic novels by French author Maurice Druon – The Accursed Kings. Precious jewels connected to royalty and infamy have also inspired a variety of curses, especially where tragedy has repeatedly struck. As a result, the gems have been deemed to be cursed – with ruin and even death the unhappy lot of whoever owns them, as demonstrated in Simon Raven’s contemporary novel, The Roses of Picardie.

Folklore also casts long shadows, with some infamy bringing a curse down on a family, which in turn has resulted in numerous tall tales, like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles, featuring fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. Elizabethan curses appear in Shakespeare … and the Bible, where the most vigorous and far-reaching are to be found in the

Old Testament … and in children’s stories such as Sleeping Beauty and Beauty and the Beast. And how many schoolgirls have giggled over Tennyson’s immortal lines: ‘The curse has come upon me,’ cried the Lady of Shallot?

Confusingly, some curses have passed into the language – the ‘Curse of Scotland’ for example can refer to (1) the nine of diamonds in the game of Pope Joan – the Pope, the Antichrist

of the Scottish reformers. (2) A great winning card in comette, introduced by Mary, Queen of Scots, and the curse of Scotland because it was the ruin of so many families. (3) The card on

which the ‘Butcher Duke’ wrote his cruel order after the Battle of Culloden. (4) Or the arms of Dalrymple, Earl of Stair, responsible for the massacre of Glencoe. (5) The nine of diamonds is said to imply royalty and ‘every ninth king of Scotland has been observed for many ages to be a tyrant and a curse to the country’. [Tour Thro’ Scotland, Grose 1789]

The dictionary definition is: To invoke or wish evil upon; to afflict; to damn; to excommunicate; evil invoked on another person, but under what circumstances can we challenge this established way of thinking and ask ourselves: Can cursing ever be justified? And if we hesitate for just a moment, then we must ask the next question: Is cursing evil? The Christian priesthood obviously felt their cause was just and as a result, the Church’s curses are so

virulent that it’s not just the ‘victim’ that suffers but their offspring in successive generations. And if a curse is thrown at the perpetrator of some terrible crime, can it really be deemed to be evil?

One curse still heard quite regularly is: ‘A plague on both their houses!’ taken from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. As John Wain observes in The Living World of Shakespeare, there is no reason, other than sheer stupidity and bloody-mindedness, that keeps the Montagues and Capulets at each other’s throats. The blame for the subsequent tragedy is equally divided between both families and therefore the curse should strike both in equal retribution, so is considered justified.

Nevertheless, do remember that curses, like chickens, have a habit of coming home to roost. This is because if not properly ‘earthed’, curses return to the curser, just as chickens that stray during the day return to their roost at night.

So … having ascertained that your ‘enemy’ is genuine, you must decide how you wish to repulse their advances. The form of your retaliation will be decided by your own personality and sense of morality – it is an extension of your own inner mind. There are no hard and fast rules, but do bear in mind that a half-hearted response is just as bad as going over the top. In either case you

will have misjudged or misread the situation; alerted your enemy to the fact that you’re on to them; and given them the opportunity to change tack. Take a look at your options:

 

  • Double up on personal protection and take defensive measures rather than taking the war into the enemy’s camp;
  • If you are not 100% sure of the source, channel the returning curse through your personal guardian/deity with the proviso that it should be ‘returned from whence it came’;
  • If you are 100% sure of the source and you wish to pay back in kind, then the method, strength and outcome should be magnified three, five, ten or a hundred fold;
  • If anger or ego is clouding your judgement, delay the return for 24 hours and reflect.

It is important not to be led astray by ego or paranoia because whatever anyone tells you, it is impossible to recall a curse once it’s been sent – which is why you need to be 100% sure of the source before retaliating. What you don’t want is to become embroiled in an astral equivalent of Gunfight at the OK Corral with magical six-guns blazing – it is tiring, time-consuming and

generates nothing but negative energy on both sides. Bob Clay-Egerton’s advice under such circumstances was: ‘There is nothing wrong with turning the other cheek, or with forgiving an offence. But there is nothing wrong either with taking protective measures against further slaps. If this is done, then you are perhaps doing a good deed by demonstrating to the attacker that, although you, yourself are not attacking, you are guarding yourself in such a way that their attacks are turned against themselves and that they are, in effect attacking, not you, but themselves. Beware then, not only of excess pride but also of excess humility. Both can be damaging.’

 

One of the most popular methods of deflecting a curse is to hang an empowered witch-ball in the main entrance hall of your home. The first written record of this method dates back to 1690 where a large glass ball, brightly painted to give a reflective surface to deflect any negative energies coming from any direction and returning them to the sender. A more modern application is the use of a mirrored ball that ‘confuses’ the energies with its broken or distorted patterns. The curse cannot connect and, having nowhere else to go, goes winging back to the sender, gathering momentum in the process.

Specifically vervain and dill were mentioned in the poem, Nymphidia, by Michael Drayton (c1627) – as a protective spell against curses. Accompany the installation of the ball with the sprinkling of those herbs cited in the 17th-century rhyme:

Trefoil, vervain, John’s wort, dill

That hindereth witches of the Will.

In Defences Against the Witches’ Craft, John Canard writes that he is a ‘great believer in returning the energy a person puts out to them. If they are sending you negative energy, reflect it to them and let them have a taste of their own medicine. The best way to ensure that somebody does not make the same mistake of directing negativity at you is to switch the tables so they receive what they were trying to give.’  But then … why go to the bother of cursing, when a bottling or binding can be just as effective?

So Mote It Be!

Pagan Portals: By Spellbook & Candle – Cursing, Hexing, Bottle and Binding by Melusine Draco is published by Moon Books.  ISBN 978 1 78099 563 2 : Pages 90 : UK£4.99/US$9.95.  Available in paperback or e-book format.

Magical Incantation to become a Werewolf

 

tumblr_nb8fqc7GPR1qdxc5jo4_1280A very long time ago, I posted this ritual on my personal website. It gained alot of attention. Unclear on the direction my writing and research was taking me, I deleted the website after so many years running. Over the past few years, I received numerous emails asking for the return of this little historical ritual. Now that we are dusting off, The Pagan and the Pen, I think there couldn’t be a more suitable place to park this little tidbit. Here’s hoping all the regulars that haunted this little piece before, stumbles back upon it….

Now, once upon a time, in one of my encyclopedias, I found a word I had not seen before, Oborot.

The meaning and origins of Oborot can be found living within Russian lore. It’s meaning clear…Werewolf.

An Oborot is a person transformed, literally, into something else. And that’s exactly what this little incantation is supposed to do….transform a man or woman into a Werewolf.


Legend says, in order to use this powerful magic, you will need a few things.

  • The incantation must be done in the woods or forest.
  • A copper knife
  • A tree that has been cut down. A tree stump.

You must go into the woods and stab the cut tree with the copper knife. Then, walk around the stump repeating this incantation:


On the sea, on the ocean, on the island, on Bujan,

On the empty pasture gleams the moon, on an ashstock lying

In a green wood, in a gloomy vale.

Toward the stock wandereth a shaggy wolf,

Horned cattle seeking for his sharp white fangs;

But the wolf dives not into the shadowy vale,

Moon, Moon, gold-horned moon,

Check the flight of bullets, blunt the hunters’ knives,

Break the Shepards’ cudgels,

Cast wild fear upon all cattle,

On men, on all creeping things,

That they may not catch the grey wolf,

That they may not rend his warm skin!

My word is binding, more binding than sleep,

More binding than the promise of a hero!


Once you feel the surge of power, you must spring or jump over the tree trunk three times. Legend says if you do, you will be transformed into a wolf. Afterwards, you are free to run off into the wilds of the forest!


Further reading:

  • The Encyclopedia of Vampires, Werewolves and Other Monsters by Rosemary Ellen Guiley
  • Baring-Gould, Sabine. The Book of Werewolves. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1865

 

Spells on the Run—->

"Cherie De Sues, Author"As a Wiccan and Gypsy, I’ve found ways to combine these two cultures into my life and faith. I enjoy using spells when I’m in need and have baskets full of colored candles, amulets, herbs, eye of newt and incense. Yes, I just threw that in to see if you were listening, I don’t recall any of my families spells from the Book of Shadows requiring the eye of a newt. Though, I have come across strange ingredients from time to time, and very easy ingredients as well.

My lifestyle as an author and freelance writer is filled with hurry, hurry, hurry, so my spells need to be quick and easy–like a microwaved meal on occasion. I’ve taken very intricate spells and reduced them down to the bare minimum, for ease of use anywhere you happen to be. Let’s face it, having a full ceremony with candles and incense burning as you chant for an hour is not always viable. In the world of fast-food, satisfying your need to connect with the Goddess may need to be in ten minutes.

So here are a couple of my favorite spells that can be done on the run! For more visit,

Irish Gypsy’s Parlor.

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I found this old charming spell on a piece of paper, slipped into my families Book of Shadows. I believe it was written by my great grandmother, it looks like her handwriting. Helping her children and grandchildren to make wishes was one of Roselyn’s favorite pastimes. We would gather in the unruly garden during the spring and summer after gathering our necessary implements.

1.  Green paper
2.  Pen or pencil
3.  Glass bowl (small)
4.  Bird Seed

Roselyn believed in making “the good wish”, not for profit or fame, but for our family of loved ones. Our wishes were for one another, so I would ask beforehand what my cousins wanted that fit the criteria of a “good wish” and held that in my mind. Each of us chose from a jar, the name of the person we would wish for until the jar was empty. Sometimes I would have two or three names and make separate wishes.

As a sole practitioner, choosing a “good wish” can be for anyone, including yourself. First write the wish on the green paper, then fold the paper three times and place the written wish into the glass bowl. Now cover the paper with bird seed as you visualize what the wish could mean for you or the one you have chosen to receive the “good wish”.

Set the bowl outside for the birds in a dry, covered area from the elements and you’re wish should come true within two weeks. If you feel the wish needs more power, fill the bowl with bird seed and wait another two weeks. Difficult wishes take time and love, remember to allow for both.

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When you feel a good friend slipping away from a misunderstanding or your lack of attention, here’s a spell to recapture their good friendship.

1.  Put an acorn in your friends hand, create a necklace by gluing the acorn onto a rawhide tie or leave have them carry the acorn in their pocket. The important thing is for the acorn to be on their person, close to them.

My honor to the mighty Oak, I planted your seed
on my dear friend (name), through thought and deed
that our friendship still be heartfelt and strong
Let (name) return to me not take long
Blessed Be,
so mote it be.

This spell must be chanted thrice every day for three days. The longer your friend wears or carries the acorn, the stronger the bond between you will grow.

ღ ¸¸.•*вℓєѕѕιηgѕ ♥

Cherie De Sues, Author