Tag Archives: Greece

Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: June 28th: Runic New Year, Hemera, Ra & Nun

 

For those who follow the whisper of the Runes, then pay close attention because today marks the completion of a year…that’s right, the Month of Dag bows it’s head and says good-bye…for now.

 

In other civilizations, Greek to be exact, Hemera was said to be born on this day. Hemera, interesting to me, because Erebus–the God of darkness and primeval chaos was said to be her father and Nyx, her sister, the Goddess of night.

 

Now scanning the distance across oceans of ancient sands, we take a look at Egypt, who would have been celebrating Ra and Nun on this day. According to their calendar, Ra would go forth and make peace with Nun.  Now we know Ra is the Sun God, but most do not know that Nun happens to be the God of primeval waters which existed long before the universe was ever created. Even though the Universe came into existence, Nun still existed, only his waters flowed within the earth and in the deep depths of the Nile.

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Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: June 27th: Aestas & Arrhephoria

 

In Ancient History, Rome would have had a festival called Aestas, which happened to be their fabulous Summertime Goddess. It seemed fitting enough since today, on their calendar, was the first day of Summer. And the beginning of Summer didn’t lack its own superstitions either. In fact, if it was raining today, then that meant it would be a very wet season.

Rome rarely does anything without Greece adding its own touch. So while Romans do their thing, the Greeks will be having their own festival called Arrhephoria. This was all about their Goddess Athena, who supposedly brought about the dew of night. The observance, though, was really all about whom Athena sent to deliver the dew, which were four young girls of Noble decent called Hersphoroi which meant ‘dew bearers’. Now these ladies didn’t really deliver the dew but they were sent to the temple of Athena in Acropolis to join in during the services of the Goddess.

 

Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: June 1: A link between Celtic and Greek Dieties, Rome’s One and not the Other, Ancient World Vampires, Norse Syn and Ancient Egypt

Time to reflect on Celtic lore, for our Ancient Calendar reveals the Celts would have honored what they called, the Hamadryads. The Hamadryads were spirits that lived within the sacred Oak trees .

The name actually came from Greece, but in that culture, had a somewhat different meaning.

In Greek lore, the Hamadryads were not Celtic spirits but, Nymphs. The connection between these two cultures may live within the whole “tree” thing, for it is said that Nymphs were individually born with an attachment to a certain tree.

According to the Greeks, if the tree died, so did the Nymph.

Also, to harm a tree connected to a Nymph was a great crime against Greek Gods.

In fact, their Gods were said to punish anyone who maliciously set out to harm either.


Over in Rome, on June 1st, a festival for two Goddesses named Carna and Cardea would be happening. These two ladies and their purposes intertwined. Goddess Carna overlooked doors and locks, while Cardea overlooked the hinges. Also, Carna protected the larger organs of the body as Cardea protected the innocent while they slept…but from what?

The Strig.

Who were the Strig? A type of Vampire/Demon, who sucked the blood of their victims while they slept.


Today is also the Kalends of June in Ancient Roman Calendars.


 

Now, let us go to the land and culture of the Norse, as they were honoring one of my favorite Goddesses named, Syn. Syn not only aided Fridd, but was also valued as a protector. In order to be granted the protection of Syn, all one had to do was invoke her.

Later, she became known as a protector of those in need of justice and those on trial.


In Ancient Egypt, they are celebrating Maat and Ra, as this is the day they go forth in secret.

Ancient Calendar: Greece & Rome–Virgins and Games: July 9, 2010

Ever hear of the Greater Panathenæa? Well it happens to be a festival which the Greeks absolutely adored and was all in honor of their Goddess Anthena. She was the patron of war, enlightenment, art, etc. The Greater Panathenæa was a big deal to the Greeks because they would have HUGE festivities today including but not limited too–races, (single and grouped), other games, prizes, feasting, wrestling, contests, dancing, and tons more.

But while the Greeks were doing that, Romans were having yet another huge day on their side of the world all in honor of their Goddess Vesta who happened to be the Goddess of fire, hearth and home. Remember me telling you sometime back about the Vestal Virgins? Same deal, which goes to show you just how important this Goddess and her priestesses were and how it must have crushed many when Christianity drove them out of Rome.

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Friday belongs to Frigga or Venus—Goddess of Love and Transformation.

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Fridays are excellent days to deal with matters or magical spells & rituals concerning…

Family life, friendship, growth, harmony, love, romance, passion.

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Planets & Elements

Venus and the element of Earth

C.H. SCARLETT
~
www.chscarlett.net

~

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Ancient Calendar: Relationships & Peace: July 4, 2010

HAPPY JULY FOURTH TO EVERYONE IN THE AMERICAS!!!!!

Wishing you the best!

Today in Ancient History, a great festival would have been held in Rome, all in honor of their Goddess of blissful relationships, Concordia. That’s right, if someone wanted their relationship to run more smoothly, or wanted happy relations period, they might call upon the Goddess. But whether they wanted it or wanted to keep it, nearly all of Rome would honor her today. In fact, her shrine which was constructed during the year of 367 BCE was smack dab in Concordia, the meeting place of the Senate. Yeah, i suppose they would want to get along as well, hu?

Now, in order to seal the deal on happiness and or harmonious relations, Rome would have also honored Pax, their Goddess of peace, who was another version of the Greek goddess Eirene. After all, you can’ get along with other people if you don’t have some peace, right?

 

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C.H. SCARLETT
~
www.chscarlett.net

~

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Ancient Calendar: June 22, 2010

One of the Greeks favorites was the woodland Pan. This God was envied and highly celebrated. So it comes of no surprise that today was just one more day in their calendar honoring him.

Pan kept to the meadows and forests. He traveled with his own entourage of Nymphs during the evening hours. Pan was famous for his sexual encounters and exploitations. Pan in his day was the equivalent of a rock star in ours.

Pan had the legs and hoofs of a goat, plus the horns of one. In fact, many believe that he was so popular–being one of the oldest gods of the Greek pantheon, that the Christians used his image to form their artistic version of Satan.

C.H. SCARLETT
www.chscarlett.net

Wyntress Nyght’s Supernatural Crack :

Published by Noble Romance Publishing–Dare to be Different!

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Ancient Calendar: June 19, 2010

Today, in Ancient History, the Greeks had a festival titled The Day of All Heras. While later, Greek writers and powers that be tried to make Hera as a jealous Goddess who would only protect the women who did not have an affair with her husband, Zeus, I went digging awhile back and found a different side of her.

Extra info taken from:

Ancient Calendar: June 12, 2010

Hera, being the so-called jealous wife of Zeus—since he couldn’t keep from messin’ around.

However, with a little research, I dug up some things not so common in popular myth.

Hera, believed to be the same as earlier Goddesses predating Gods, was believed to have originated in early Aegean civilizations (along with Rhea–pre Hellenic).

Queens who ruled by her name, carried the title Hiera "Holy One."

According to Barbara G. Walkers "The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths & Secrets", Hera was originally the Mother of the Gods, subordinate to no one, and a Great mother who made kings AND gods. In fact, Zeus was not as ancient as she, but that would be changed once writers began to pen something different.

It wasn’t until Greek Authors attempted to make a male deity older and stronger—Zeus, that Hera became a jealous wife and woman. The arguing between Hera and Zeus seems to be symbolic of the arguing between the cults of that time–patriarchal & matriarchal–who battled over the truths of Hera and of other gods & goddesses.

As a trinity, she was Hera, Hebe, and Hecate. (Representing the moons–New, full, and old– Virgin of Spring, Mother of Summer, destroying Crone of Autumn.

Hera spread through Europe and even the Saxon’s made worship of her at Heresburg (Hera’s Mount) known to be the phallic column of the world.

Some sources claim Hera’s name may have meant He Era, the earth.

 

C.H. SCARLETT
~Casey~
www.chscarlett.net

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While doing a crossword puzzle…

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