All posts by Nimue Brown

Druid, author, dreamer, folk enthusiast, parent, wife to the most amazing artist -Tom Brown. Drinker of coffee, maker of puddings. Exploring life as a Pagan, seeking good and meaningful ways to be, struggling with mental health issues and worried about many things.

Traveling the Fairy Path by Morgan Daimler (Book Review)

In the cupboard-sized alcove of an independent bookstore in Vermont, the red spine of this book caught my eye. Then, I saw the title, and almost of its own accord, the book was open in my hand, my eyes scanning the pages. Though I’ve not quite finished with this book, I thought what a perfect complement it might be to St. Patrick’s Day today.

I am fascinated by all things Celtic, Irish, mythology, spirituality, and the world of fairy. Maybe it was all those formative years in the hospital where my mind was free to roam and wander and wonder. But, one of the things I’ve truly enjoyed about this book is the author’s academic study of the historical connotations. For some of the poem-like structures, she breaks them down into the original language as well as puts them in plain English.

As a faith practice, I appreciated the no…

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Brigid by Morgan Daimler

Pagan Book Reviews

Pagan Portals: Brigid
Morgan Daimler
Moon Books, 2015

wp36 brigid daimler review

Review by Hugh Eckert.

The pan-Celtic Goddess Brigid is my Patroness, so naturally I’m interested in books about Her. All too often, I find that there’s a tendency to reduce Her to a facet of the Wiccan “Great Goddess” or the “Divine Feminine” of Goddess spirituality. There’s also considerable confusion between the Goddess Brigid, and the Christian saint that bears the same name. I’m a polytheist Pagan, and for me Brigid is an individual, discrete Goddess (or set of Goddesses; a matter which Daimler addresses in her book).

With all that, I was excited to read what Morgan Daimler had to say about Brigid. Daimler is an Irish reconstructionist Pagan with a strong grounding in scholarship and an interest in presenting a balance between research and personal religious experience. This is a living faith to her, and I get the impression that…

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The Power of Change

The Catbox

I’ve seen an increasing number of articles recently speaking about how the poor management of this country is leading folks to tighten their belts. People are worried, the future is uncertain. I’m sure most of you will know what I mean. Sadly, it’s not unique to the UK either.

But I’m also seeing something else… that started small, before all of the Brexit trouble. It’s now really picking up speed and developing in a good way. It’s exploring what we can do to improve lives, as individuals and small communities.

What started as a pastime or hobby has (often through necessity) become self-employment or a small business. I had to pursue my Druidry professionally after being forced out of my NHS job, but never has there been so much demand for what I do.

I’m so glad that people call on me for ministry, to perform rites of passage or…

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Review: Double Whammy of Hands-On Magic

Parting the Mists

We are fast approaching Yule, and most witches and pagans that I know will undoubtedly appreciate one type of gift: a book. For those seeking some focused on hands-on magic, I’ve recently combed through a couple books on this subject.

Late this summer I picked up two titles from publisher Moon Books, Pagan Portals: Candle Magic and Pagan Portals: Poppets and Magical Dolls, both by author Lucya Starza. Both provide introductions to their respective subject, which was perfect for my purpose. As a priestess novitiate of the Daughters of the Sacred Grail, I lead a monthly group study of practical magic. Several of the ladies in our local hearth are fairly new to hands-on magical practice, so I was looking for a couple books to serve as touchstones for the study.

These books fit the bill almost perfectly.

First, Starza’s tone was approachable and unpretentious – I felt as…

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Review of Every Day Magic

Wendy Steele

I treated myself to Every Day Magic in paperback in early December with some of my birthday money.

Every Day Magic - A Pagan Book of Days: 366 Magical Ways To Observe The Cycle Of The Year by [Starza, Lucya]

Every Day Magic, A Pagan Book of Days, is a gem of a little book. On every page are treasures, ideas, recipes, meditations, spells and so much more. Whatever pantheon you follow, or even if you don’t follow one at all, you’ll enjoy exploring thoughts from other lands and belief systems.

I read this book from  cover to cover first but it’s an ideal book to dip into at Sabbats and Esbats or just because you feel like it.

A perfect book to bring a little magic into every day.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Every-Day-Magic-Magical-Observe/dp/1785355678/ref

https://www.amazon.com/Every-Day-Magic-Magical-Observe/dp/1785355678/ref

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The Shamanic Bear Who Was Troubled By Owls

sheila north

There once was an old bear who was a shaman for the creatures in the Cantley area of Doncaster. Though he was a powerful shaman – some said, the most powerful in all of the borough – one winter, he was plagued by owls.

Owls in his medicine bag. Owls on his prayer mat. Owls in his wardrobe. Owls in his hat.

That Solstice, he visited his great friend Rabbit, who lived in nearby Bessacarr. Rabbit was also a powerful shaman. Some said she was even more skilled than Bear. Certainly, even Bear agreed that she had a much better hedge and nest side manner than him, and she was frequently consulted by many of the animals in her area. However, some Bessacarr creatures were too posh to be seen consorting with a shaman. Consequently, Rabbit met them in the less swanky cafés and pubs in central Doncaster. Rabbit’s clients…

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BOOK REVIEW: MERLIN

contemplativeinquiry

Elen Sentier’s Merlin Once & Future Wizard is a marvel, highly recommended. The author effortlessly charms us into a fresh and extended understanding of Merlin, introducing us to a “huge, ancient, wise and powerful” being –  teacher, trickster and friend. For me, her introductory Who Is Merlin? chapter offers the best description of the essential Merlin I have ever read.

“Merlin is a liminal being. Liminal means a threshold, a place between past and future, between here and there, between one world and another … and he is always standing at that threshold. He is that place. And that ever-changing constant threshold is now, the here-and-now, and it’s constantly in motion like the sea”. Merlin teaches us, if we are willing, to “be continuously and consciously aware that you stand in the middle of change all the time, whatever is going on”. This is a lifelong learning. It cannot…

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