All posts by Nimue Brown

Druid, author, dreamer, folk enthusiast, parent, wife to the most amazing artist -Tom Brown. Drinker of coffee, maker of puddings. Exploring life as a Pagan, seeking good and meaningful ways to be, struggling with mental health issues and worried about many things.

Religious Law and Personal Codes

A Wise Fool

I was inspired to write this post by two factors:

1, being this post on the concept of honour by Nimue Brown, it gives a great comparison on honour being an excuse to beat people up and honour being a sense of doing the right thing, despite all odds.

2, being a conversation with Devi regarding religion and her stance being that any form of organised religion is a method of control.

Both of these made me think of my concepts of honour and what religious laws (if any) that I followed.

What came to mind was my favourite quote from Diogenes Laertius when describing the observed law of the religion of the Celtic people:

…. to honour the gods, to do no evil, and to practise bravery….

Diogenes Laertius was writing about the Druids and the law they taught to the rest of Celtic society, he…

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Gods and Goddesses of Wales – a review

A new book for Pagans and of particular interest to Druids…

Druid Life

June 2019 sees the release of Halo Quin’s Gods and Goddesses of Wales. This is a Pagan Portal – meaning it’s a short, introductory book. I read it a while ago – one of the many perks of my working life.

I very much like Halo as a human being. I’ve spent time with her at Druid Camp, she’s a warm, lovely person full of inspiration. She’s not identifying as a Druid – but honestly what she writes is just the sort of thing for a Druid starting out on their path. Welsh mythology has a central role in modern Druidry, but getting into it can be a bit of a struggle. This is an ideal beginner’s book, giving you very readable and relevant takes on those key myths and figures.

This is a relevant book for anyone interested in Welsh mythology or deities associated with the British Isles. It’s…

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The Healing Power of Celtic Plants by Angela Paine

The Esoteric Book Review

The Healing Power of Celtic Plants

Angela Paine

published by O Books

RRP £16.99, PB, 286p

reviewed by John Canard

This is an absorbing work which covers the history, myth and symbolism of twenty-five plants known to the British Celts and used by them medicinally. From a healer’s or herbalist’s point of view, the most interesting
aspect of the book is the information on the practical uses of the plants, including how to prepare them, doseage, and contraindications. By contrasting the ancient herbal use against the scientific evidence for their effectiveness.

The plants covered in depth in the book are bilberry, burdock, clivers, coltsfoot, comfrey, dandelion, elder, flax, fumitory, ground ivy, guelder rose, hawthorn, meadowsweet, mistletoe, motherwort, nettle, plantain, roseroots, silver birch, St John’s wort, thyme, valerian, vervain, willow and yellow dock.

As well as exploring the herbs, the book explains how to find them, grow and preserve them. Additionally…

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NEW BOOK RELEASED!!! – Gods and Goddesses of Wales

Halo's Journal

It’s here!!! Midsummer 2019 has completed a piece of devotion for me…

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Pagan Portals: Gods and Goddesses of Wales is out!!!

I’m really excited to announce the manifestation of my newest book, a practical introduction of Welsh deities and their stories, through their stories. It’s designed as a primer to get started on your journey with beings such as Rhiannon, Blodeuwedd, Taliesin, Gwydion, and more. There’s even a pronounciation guide at the back (thanks Sarah!)

Here’s the official blurb:

An introduction to Welsh deities through traditional myths and practical exercises. Written by a practising witch, living in the heart of Wales and working with the deities woven into the land, this book contains the major stories and backgrounds for the Gods and Goddesses of the heartland of the Druids. Within its pages you will find information on the major deities and where their stories can be found, alongside suggestions on…

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Gardening with the Moon & Stars

Elen Sentier

GWTMS Amazon coverGardening with the Moon & Stars brings biodynamics to the ordinary gardener. Elen Sentier is passionate about biodynamics. She feels it’s vital to make organics and biodynamics available to as many people as possible if we are to help our earth cope with the increasing demands we humans place upon her. Biodynamics is easy, simple, cheap and super-effective; it’s seriously good horticulture too, and it works in whatever size of garden you have, from a window box to several acres. This book is written in plain down-to-earth language with lots of tips and hints to help you learn how easy it is to use the preparations and work with the star calendar.

Here’s an excerpt…

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A Deed Without A Name

Australis Incognita

I’ve got a small stock pile of books on my desk. Presently, Lee Morgan’s A Deed Without A Name: Unearthing the Legacy of Traditional Witchcraft constitutes half the pile. I’ve just purchased a few more copies that will make their way north as gifts to friends who I think, simply, needs must read it.

And who should not? I’ve hesitated to put up a review because it’s going to be biased. Really, really biased. Because Lee Morgan is fabulous, and I feel qualified to say so, I’ve known Lee a really long time. Lee is my teacher, my friend, and I tend to suffer from a large level of emotional investment in my loved one’s projects and activities. Which I think is completely justifiable. But now that’s clear, and out of the way, I’ll put on my reasonable, measured voice and start referring to the author by her last…

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BOOK REVIEW for A MODERN CELT and CELTIC WITCH CRAFT by Mabh Savage

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Reading the books of author Mabh Savage feels like visiting an old friend and having a  relaxed conversation at her kitchen table!

The thing that struck me most, as I first held Celtic Witchcraft in my hand, was the short bio on the back informing me she “was raised by two Wiccan parents who have a passion for Celtic history, both mythological and actual”. Wow! Having been raised in a Roman Catholic family (and then spending several decades “debriefing myself”), my mind started spinning, trying to imagine what it would be like to have Wiccan parents like Mabh!

In her book A Modern Celt Mabh’s parents speak for themselves. There is a whole chapter where she visits and interviews them. She gives a verbatim account of the conversation. She does the same thing with friends who have an interesting background, gift or message.

In Celtic Withcraft she describes how Celtic…

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