Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: November 20th: A Greek Initiation and An Egyptian Goddess Linked to New Age Vampires

 

Today, Greece is holding a festival for Praetextatus & Paulina.

Praetextatus & Paulina happen to be the keepers of the Eleusinian Mysteries.

Today an initiation ritual would have been preformed by the Greeks and their Priestesses. That’s what the Eleusinian Mysteries are, initiation of the initiate, along with whatever celebration and ceremony that moment called for.

These mysteries belonged to Demeter and her daughter Persephone. These mysteries, not to be confused with lesser ones, were the greatest and most sacred in all of Greece.

In Egypt, we have another feast going on. This one is for Sekhmet—a goddess you really don’t hear too  much anymore unless you frequent Vampire communities online or, maybe, in life.

Vampires or those who are into that lifestyle, having their own reasons, have adopted this Goddess into their own personal pantheon, but in Ancient Egypt, no such belief existed *winks*—least not on this day of course.

On this day, Egyptians would have held  a huge feast in Sekhmet’s honor and homage paid to her Purifying Flame.

Her name means power or might. She sustains the spirits of those who have died by bringing them food in the Underworld.  If you are living, she would be important to you to as well. For if you have need of conquest, vengeance, or punishment for wrong doers, then you would skirt off to a Temple of Sekhmet.

Beginning as a warrior, she was all about protection. The Pharaohs’ depended on Sekhmet greatly for protecting them. It is said that her breath created the deserts.

Sekhmet (Sakhmet) is one of the oldest known Egyptian deities. Her name is derived from the Egyptian word “Sekhem” (which means “power” or “might”) and is often translated as the “Powerful One”. She is depicted as a lion-headed woman, sometimes with the addition of a sun disc on her head. Her seated statues show her holding the ankh of life, but when she is shown striding or standing she usually holds a sceptre formed from papyrus (the symbol of northern or Lower Egypt) suggesting that she was associated primarily with the north. However, some scholars argue that the deity was introduced from Sudan (south of Egypt) where lions are more plentiful.

Sekhmet was represented by the searing heat of the mid-day sun (in this aspect she was sometimes called “Nesert”, the flame) and was a terrifying goddess. However, for her friends she could avert plague and cure disease. She was the patron of Physicians, and Healers and her priests became known as skilled doctors. As a result, the fearsome deity sometimes called the “lady of terror” was also known as “lady of life”. Sekhmet was mentioned a number of times in the spells of The Book of the Dead as both a creative and destructive force, but above all, she is the protector of Ma´at (balance or justice) named “The One Who Loves Ma´at and Who Detests Evil”. Source

Links for further reading:

The Ecole Initiative: The Eleusinian Mysteries

Eleusinian Mysteries - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sekhmet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ancient Egyptian Gods Online--Sekhmet

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