Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: July 7: A Slave Saves Rome & a Farewell to Duir

Roman-women-bathing

 

Once Upon a Time, very, very long ago, Rome was defeated by Gauls. Just like all wars coming to an end, those who win have demands. Gaul demanded that all the women of Rome be given over to them. All Noble Women, that is. You can just imagine what Gaul would have done with them.

Having no other choice, Rome was about to hand their women over, until a Roman slave named, Tutula, also known as, Philotis, offered a better and most clever solution. Instead of sending the noble ladies of Rome off into the mercy of Rome’s enemies, why not send slave girls? Tutula, with all her wisdom, suggested that Rome dress up the slave girls to look like Noble women. This would give Rome time to forge further plots and plans against Gaul….

Once inside the camp of Rome’s enemy, the slave women worked their charms by making the soldiers very happy and very, very drunk. The Gaul men passed out and as they did, Tutula gave the signal to the Roman soldiers hiding ever-so-patiently within the surrounding darkness.

Because of the wisdom and skills of a slave named, Tutula, Rome was able to flip the tables on a war thought to have been lost.

Because of that night and what Tutula did, today would have been known as Nonæ Caprotinæ–the second of two festivals. While Rome would celebrate the very event Tutula helped shape, Noble Women and Slaves were free to eat, make merry and celebrate together.

Tonight’s festival would also honor the Goddess Juno. Romans would also have another festival on this day that was also important to the Harvests, called Consulia, honoring the god of the earth, Consus.

Interestingly enough, Consus’s alter, which stood at the, Circus Maximus, was kept covered with earth all year long except for three days. After uncovering it today, they would have had chariot races, a Roman festival of Handmaids, or otherwise known as, the maid’s day out, and many other celebrations to make the people of Rome very happy and to honor a God, which Rome depended on for food, etc.

Also in Roman calendar, today would have been the Nones of July.

On another Ancient note, the Celtic tree month of Duir ends today. To read more about this month, check out: Ancient Calendar & Pagan Holidays: June 14th: Physical & Symbolic Doors to New Things and Other Dimensions, New Runic Half-Month, A Son of Odin and an Epic Song of Muses

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