An Interview with a Warrior Poet

In my other role, as a publisher of Pagan and Heathen eBooks via Wyrdwood Publications, I have the pleasure of publishing the Asatru author, Robert Allard.

In his eBook, Warrior Poet ~ Musings of an Asatru Warrior, he has written a collection of fifteen evocative poems and kennings, in the style of the poetic Eddas and brings to a modern day world the excitement and atmosphere of the ancient warrior ways.

For this months column, I thought you would enjoy learning more about this author and how his chosen path of Asatru led him to write this engaging eBook.

Welcome to The Pagan Heathen, Robert.

Thank you for inviting me.

Tell us a little about yourself and how you found your path of Asatru.

It all started a few years ago during an overseas exercise in the north of Germany with the 433 squadron, a CF 18 tactical squadron of the Canadian armed forces, we were stationed in Scleshvig Holstein close to the remains of the old Viking settlement of Hitabu. I found that I had the time to visit the site, see all the artefacts in the museum and it led me on the path I’m now travelling.

What events led you to write the ‘Warrior Poet ~ Musings of an Asatru Warrior’?

The world of today does not recognize the warrior ethos as the old ways portrayed it and as such, a great imbalance is created. The every day hero of our time should have a chance to enjoy his accomplishments, boast if you will and have a voice in our time, as well as the time of our ancestors. I hope that my eBook is a testament to those that fight every day for their family and for a better life.

Your eBook is written in the Old Norse style of the Poetic Eddas. The Asatru tradition finds these writings; the Poetic and Prose Eddas, the Sagas and the Hávamál of great importance. Could you briefly tell the readers what they are?

The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius, the Poetic Edda is the most important extant source on Norse mythology and Germanic heroic legends.

They are written in the old skaldic metering and are a great influence in the Scandinavian literature of the early 19th Century. The Prose Edda is, as it says, a prose version of the Edda written by Snorri Sturluson, who had a monumental part in the revival of the old scripts, which were almost forgotten at that time.

As for the Sagas, they are the accounts of heros and the lives of the settelers of Iceland, Greenland and also Vinland.
Do you feel that these ancient writings are still relevant to our modern day society?

I believe that the essence of them is very much relevant in this day and age. They’re a beacon showing the old values, which are not often shared in our time, like respect of our elders, honour in life, standing by your actions and living with their outcome and this, in my opinion, will never be outdated nor unwarranted in any age.Which of the Old Norse Sagas would you like to have been written about you, and why?

Actually, there are some Sagas that I do identify with. One of them is The Saga of Grettir the Strong. Grettis saga tells of a man that lived his life following his own destiny, making his own choices and living by them to his end.

What items, either in this modern day world or in the old heathen ways, give you inspiration for your writing?

I have some battle ready swords that I have been using in medieval re-enactment, they are notched and broken from the countless tournaments I have fought in during the past 10 years or so. They are living proof of the old ways, the extreme power of the sword and the terrible outcome of it, when used to resolve conflict. The naked and terrible truth, of the use of force, should not be used lightly and is the warrior’s burden of responsibility.

What other writing projects are you working on at present?

I’m working on an Asatru science fiction novel called the ‘Saga of the Nine Worlds’, which portrays the Asatru nation of the future on an exploration of space to find the nine worlds of the Edda. This is made a reality by finding space maps hidden away in the old scripts.

Obviously, you live your path 24 hrs a day; into what other creative pursuits do you channel your path?

The living study of how they lived through re-enactment, also leather working and photography.

If you could be remembered as a modern Asatru Warrior, what deed do you feel you would be remembered for?

As a herald showing that the old ways are not forgotten and can be integrated in our life. Warrior glory can be found through making the grades at school or getting that new job or improving yourself to be ready to win in any challenges of your life.

Thank you for being with us today, Robert.

Thank you.

*To read more about this eBook and to purchase it, please go HERE.*

Review of Warrior Poet ~ Musings of an Asatru Warrior

Review by Crystal Allard
Editor In Chief
Building Bridges Newsletter

(…)

He [Robert Allard] gives his reader a glimpse into the heart of his creativity and does it with passion. His use of Kennings is profound and authentic. Robert has captured the essence of a warrior, wrapped it in chain mail and served it to his reader with the nine noble virtues as his shield.

Yule is just around the corner and if you’re looking for the perfect gift for the heathen on your list, I believe Warrior Poet, Musings of an Asatru Warrior would satisfy even the harshest of critics. (…)

To read the entire review, please go HERE

Blessings to your Hearth,

Edain
Edain Duguay.com
Paranormal/Fantasy Novelist, Best Selling eBook Author and Award Winning Blog Writer.

Author of the blogs:
English, Pagan and in Canada
Worlds Of My Own Making
Gramarye, The Magical Homestead

Contact Edain @ Facebook Twitter YouTube Blogger

7 thoughts on “An Interview with a Warrior Poet”

  1. Good interview, and the book sounds interesting but is there anywhere where one could see at least a few lines of the poetry itself?

    I find the thought of buying a book of poems a bit strange when you have no idea if the style of poetry is even the sort of thing you might like – if you see what I mean.

    Like

  2. I was researching the part of my paternal lineage that is descended from Simon Allard who emigrated to New France in 1683 or 1684, and came across the above article.

    Being a bit of a skald myself (and Asatru), my curiosity was quite piqued.

    Looks like a new book for the library next payday =)

    Rake Care – Pip

    Like

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