Plastic Surgery Overdose?

I was watching CNN Headline News (Showbiz Tonight) recently and they were interviewing the plastic surgeon that performed ten surgeries, including liposuction, on Heidi Montag. Other doctors have lashed out and called him irresponsible for doing so many procedures on a woman that didn’t need them. When asked if he went too far with plastic surgery on the reality starlet, Dr. Frank Ryan defended his actions, seeing nothing wrong with someone having ten surgeries for basically no reason. It’s not like she was fat or ugly. (I said that last part, not the doc). As I recall, the doctor’s face looked a tad too tight, as if he had a few too many tucks done on his face. Snicker. That might explain why he sees nothing wrong with what he did to Ms. Montag. Dr. Ryan even had the audacity to call Heidi Montag a hero for admitting to her surgeries. A hero? Not.

What’s wrong with this picture? On the left, Heidi Montag before going under the knife and on the right, Heidi after surgery. Does a beautiful twenty-three year old woman need ten surgeries? Now she looks really freaky, kind of like a plastic blow up doll.

Is this a disease like anorexia? Do beautiful people like Heidi look in the mirror and see an ugly person? I wondered about this because there are more people like her that keep getting surgeries until they don’t look human anymore. Look at what happened to Michael Jackson. His nose pretty much disintegrated.

The other thing that bothers me about all this plastic surgery is that pretty soon everyone will look exactly the same—like pod people. That creeps me out. I remember an actress named Jennifer Grey. She was really popular, starring in Dirty Dancing and Red Dawn, and was on her way to becoming a big star. She had a unique look, kind of ethnic, but that’s what made her so appealing. Her nose wasn’t a perfect little nub, but she was pretty. Well, she got a nose job and has hardly worked as an actress since then. I think I saw her in a Lifetime movie and I didn’t even recognize her. She looked just like every other actress in Hollywood and apparently lost her appeal with casting agents. I read an interview she did in a magazine and she admitted that she regretted getting a nose job.

Do some people and doctors take plastic surgery too far? Should doctors be held accountable for doing excessive surgeries? After all, they are the professionals and should know better.

Kelley Heckart

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Druidry and Difficulty

Talking with a friend last night, he asked the challenging, but important question ‘and how does this fit with your druidry?’ He’s a druid, I’m a druid, other people caught up in my situation consider themselves pagan. My friend commented that it is interesting watching this ‘car crash’ with an eye to the pagan aspect of it. Surely folks who are committed to honourable relationship ought to be able to do better?

How does this fit with my druidry? It doesn’t, is the short answer. To my shame, there have been a lot of times of late, when just getting through the day, working out how to survive and stay on top of things, has been as much as I could manage. To sit down and analyse my actions in terms of honour, is a hard thing to do. I see all the places I’ve fallen short, the decisions I could have made better, or sooner. There are reasons – aren’t there always? Am I just making excuses for myself? I have no idea how to walk an honourable path through what’s happening. My only point of reference that I feel confident about is trying to make sure my child has what he needs, and where possible, what he wants as well. His being safe and happy seems straightforward enough as an ethical position.

Honourable relationship, as I understand it, is a two sided thing, calling for trust, patience, respect. Where those are missing, honesty and openness are not just difficult, but potentially dangerous. An honourable relationship is one which includes a degree of care for the other. Now, in some situations, I do ok, I think. Negotiating things through with Tom, and with my son, we find solutions that take things forward, without seeking to blame or wound anyone. But, in other situations I have been told I am dishonourable, untrustworthy, rude, and lying, that I am an emotional blackmailer, an attacker, a user of others. Not an honourable sort of person at all, nor, would it appear, am I the kind of person therefore that anyone could relate to honourably. I worry about this a lot. Because there have been moments when anger or fear got the better of me, when emotion made me less than perfectly civilised. I have tried so hard to speak calmly, to be reasonable and polite, haunted by the memory of having someone shout into my face that I am rude, and that lots of people think it is so. These things still keep me awake at night.

Druidry does not offer any external measures. There’s no yardstick to take my behaviour to and check it against, no rules to give me clarity. There’s no formal priesthood whose judgement I can seek, nor anyone who can offer me absolution for my failings. There is only my perception, and how that relates to everyone else’s. Have I acted honourably? I do not know. Have I done the right things? Well, a lot of the people I trust seem to think so, but no doubt others do not. How does this relate to my druidry? I wish I had a better answer to give. I’m turning to my druidry a lot, looking for sense, for strength and ways of holding myself together. I’m painfully aware of having little to give, able to offer little service to the gods, the land or the communities I have landed in. Is it ok to be angry? Is it ok to be grieving, or am I just feeling sorry for myself? Is it ok to ask for help, or am I becoming a nuisance? I have no idea what’s ok, really, where I am concerned.

It’s in the hard times that a person’s true nature shows through. It’s not so hard to be a druid when you have time, energy and enthusiasm to devote to it. Have I held onto anything, in all of this, that resembles druid practice? I think the answer is no, I have not, because I am too mired in fear. I am not being a druid, I am merely surviving.