Ancient Calendar: June 12, 2010

 

 

All those in classical Greece would have placed Oak leaves on their body in some way on this day in Ancient History. They did this to honor Zeus.

In Egypt, they would have been having a festival for the Goddess Mut who happened to be Amun’s wife.

Once the sun went down over in the Land of the Welsh, a great feast would have been thrown for Epona which was their divinity linked to horses and fertility. The evening would have been called Gwyl o Epona.

 

And we say good-bye to the Goddess Month of Hera for it now comes to an end. Hera, being the so-called jealous wife of Zeus—since he couldn’t keep from messin’ around.

However, with a little research, I dug up some things not so common in popular myth.

Hera, believed to be the same as earlier Goddesses predating Gods, was believed to have originated in early Aegean civilizations (along with Rhea–pre Hellenic).

Queens who ruled by her name, carried the title Hiera "Holy One."

According to Barbara G. Walkers "The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths & Secrets", Hera was originally the Mother of the Gods, subordinate to no one, and a Great mother who made kings AND gods. In fact, Zeus was not as ancient as she, but that would be changed once writers began to pen something different.

It wasn’t until Greek Authors attempted to make a male deity older and stronger—Zeus, that Hera became a jealous wife and woman. The arguing between Hera and Zeus seems to be symbolic of the arguing between the cults of that time–patriarchal & matriarchal–who battled over the truths of Hera and of other gods & goddesses.

As a trinity, she was Hera, Hebe, and Hecate. (Representing the moons–New, full, and old– Virgin of Spring, Mother of Summer, destroying Crone of Autumn.

Hera spread through Europe and even the Saxon’s made worship of her at Heresburg (Hera’s Mount) known to be the phallic column of the world.

Some sources claim Hera’s name may have meant He Era, the earth.

 

C.H. Scarlett

www.chscarlett.net

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