Ancient Calendar: May 26, 2010

Story.gif picture by Beloved_Isis

In many circles of Paganism, today is and was Sacred Well Day. What does that mean? Well, it meant that most people would decorate and gussy their Wells up with flowers, and whatever else. If we do this, then the spirits who have passed over, could very well rise up and speak to us. In many corners, Wells were doorways into other worlds. People would use them for Divination and all sorts of fab–things. What cool Well lore do you know?

In Ancient Egypt, this day would have been known as “Receiving of Ra“.

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A little announcement. Yes, Ancient Calendar is the same as Pagan Holidays. I just thought this title might be a bit more accurate. We also have our own page, located Ancient Calendar.

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©C.H. SCARLETT

www.chscarlett.net

Coming   Soon from Noble Romance Publishing Click to Purchase

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One thought on “Ancient Calendar: May 26, 2010”

  1. Mmmm … touched a thread for me, ta :-). My aunt (before she passed on) owned a sacred well in North Devon – see http://www.devon.gov.uk/index/cultureheritage/libraries/localstudies/devonplaces/historicchittlehampton.htm?nocache=45#myfavourites – I’ve one of the original prints of the pic in the article from my stepmother. The water is said to cure cattaract … ie give clear vision (clairvoyance ???) … as are many sacred wells. My first novel – OWL WOMAN – is based around this legend.

    The village does a mystery play and well ceremony on 8th July – the sacred day – and I’ve got a pic of my stepmother acting in this. Later, when I was at the village school, I acted in it myself … one year I got to be Urith and got my head chopped off! Fortunately, superglue stuck it back on again LOL, but it was an amazing experience for a 9-yr-old. I’d reccommend it to anayone, getting killed and coming back to life, even if only in a play.

    I have many memories of playing by the well and talking to the spirits as a little child. My parents and aunt never discouraged this, thank the gods, so I was lucky there.

    The name Urith comes from the ancient brythonic name for the Mother Goddess “Ywrydd”, and also has relations to the Gaelic name for the goddess. The church is dedicated to Urith so the name of the Mother has been venerated there for some 4000 years without changes! I think this is wonderful :-).

    Like

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