Review: ‘Brigid: Meeting the Goddess of Poetry, Forge and Healing Well’ by Morgan Daimler

Signposts in the Mist

Brigid by Morgan DaimlerBrigid: Meeting the Goddess of Poetry, Forge and Healing Well is an introduction to the multi-faceted Celtic goddess, Brigid, by Irish Polytheist Morgan Daimler. In this book, Morgan traces the threads of the ‘enormous, brightly coloured tapestry’ that gives form to Brigid in the twenty-first century to their original sources.

Morgan centres on the well-known Irish depiction of Brigid as three sisters in the 14th C Sanas Cormac: ‘Brigid of the Poets, Brigid of the Forge, Brigid the Healer’. She introduces Brigid’s earliest representations as the daughter of the Dagda and member of the Tuatha dé Danann in The Caith Maige Tuired and Lebor Gabala Erenn. Lesser know Brigids from the Ulster Cycle: Brigid the Hospitaller, Brigid of the Judgements and Brigid the Cowless are also introduced.

A chapter focuses on Brigid by other names: the Gaulish Brigandu, British Brigantia, Scottish Bride, Welsh Ffraid and Saint Brigid…

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Gwyn Ap Nudd by Danu Forest

Pagan Book Reviews

Pagan Portals: Gwyn Ap Nudd — Wild God of Faerie, Guardian of Annwn
Danu Forest
Moon Books, 2017

wp36 gwyn ap nudd review

Review by Anthony Rella.

A contribution to Moon Books’ Pagan Portals series, Danu Forest’s Gwyn Ap Nudd is a slender book that provides an accessible and welcoming path to Celtic mythology, Welsh divinities, and a nature-centered practice. At only 94 pages, one still has the foundational material to begin a rich journey into nature worship, connection to the Fae, and devotional practice with this powerful god of the old Britons.

Through each section, Forest provides overviews and discussion of various myths associated with Gwyn Ap Nudd — as guardian of the underworld, as king of the fae, as leader of the Wild Hunt, and as one who lives in the glass castle of Glastonbury Tor. With each facet of this complex and intriguing figure, Forest offers suggestive insights into how a modern-day…

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This Ancient Heart – The Threefold Relationship Between Landscape, Ancestor and Self

dancing in the mist

This Ancient Heart is a collection of essays by well known Pagan and spiritual authors on our relationships with and connections to landscape and the ancestors.

In the Forward by Graham Harvey the scene is set where he says “Much of the curious, unexpected and fascinating is revealed in the book you are now reading” and then asks us to begin to think about our own perspectives on the subject by reminding us that “It is, as with any book, important that readers begin with some reflections about their own expectations and anticipations.”

The Introduction by Paul Davies sets the scene more firmly where he talks of the ancestors, stating “Their bodies are part of this earth and this earth is equally part of us – in flesh, in DNA as much as in spirit. In this way, we are the ancestors reborn. I like that thought…..”

He mentions the…

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The boar-hunt – excerpt from The Grail

Druid Life

This is an excerpt from Simon Stirling’s The Grail, which I reviewed here – https://druidlife.wordpress.com/2018/04/29/the-grail-relic-of-an-ancient-religion-a-review/

The Annals of Tigernach list four battles for the year 594:

The battle of Ratha in Druadh & the battle of Áird Sendoim.  The slaying of the sons of Áedán i.e. Bran & Domangart & Eochaid Find & Artúr, in the battle of Circhenn, in which Áedán was the victor, & the battle of Corann.

The first two battles were closely linked, the battle of Áird Sendoim (‘The Headland’, near Peterhead, ‘on the coast of Mordei’) being immediately followed by Arthur’s ‘Unrestrained Ravaging’ of Morgan’s Tillymorgan hill-fort.  The Annals of Ulster described this as the ‘battle of Ràth in druaid’ (Early Irish ràth, a ‘residence surrounded by an earthen rampart’).  It took place in the ‘Sorcerer’s land’ (Early Irish drui – a ‘Druid’; genitive druad).  Morgan was considered ‘skilful’ (medrod) by…

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Shamanism in the 21st Century

Grey Areas Journal is eclectic, inclusive and multi-cultural…. the creator Yann is a force of nature in himself and welcomes conversation and debate…. as the title ‘Grey Areas’ suggests.

Charlotte Gush alerted us to this project having written an article about Shamanism for Grey Areas. That article sits in the ‘Focus on Faith’ section and really is a short commentary on how the Shamanic Way can help heal communities by engaging with Nature. It may be news to some but also a reminder to others. It’s not a specifically Pagan piece per say but is inclusive of, due to her personal path and perspective .

You can find the August edition of Grey Areas here – https://sunbirdenterprise.wordpress.com/2018/07/28/grey-areas-2nd-edition-aug-2018/

Find out more about Charlotte Gush’s work here – https://www.shamanicway.co.uk/ 

We’re always open to shouting out new projects so if you want something promoted, just drop us a line!

Gatherer of Souls

Signposts in the Mist

I have recently finalised my third book, Gatherer of Souls, a collection of poems and stories recovering the forgotten mythos of my patron god, Gwyn ap Nudd. I am  very pleased and proud to reveal the cover art, which is by Tom Brown. The publication and book launch will take place on Saturday 29th September (Gwyn’s Feast).

Gatherer of Souls FC

Gwyn ap Nudd is a Brythonic god of the dead and ruler of Annwn. In medieval Welsh literature he is depicted gathering the souls of slaughtered warriors from the battlefield, and is said to contain the fury of the spirits of Annwn to prevent their destruction of the world.

Fierce and compassionate, beautiful and terrifying, Gwyn’s ambivalent nature was unacceptable to Christians. He and his spirits were demonised. Gwyn was replaced as a warrior-protector of Britain by his opponent, Arthur, and the doors of Annwn were slammed shut.

After centuries of…

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Kitchen Witchcraft Spells and Charms review

By Cosmic Dancer

This is the 15th book I have got from this wonderful author…and I’m quite established at my practice. This book is just brilliant to just dip in and out of, I read it cover to cover when I got it. It covers an array of spells and charms from prosperity to confidence, banishing and healing. It’s perfect for the beginner as well as the more experienced witch. The fab thing about these spells and charms is, that most of the things needed you may have in your home anyway, so no great expense to pay out, and if you have read some of Rachel’s other books you will know if you don’t have something, you can use other things, such as your finger if you don’t have a wand. A brilliant book and well worth a place on your bookcase.

Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & Charms is a the first in a series of books which delves into the world of the Kitchen Witch. Each book breaks down the whys and wherefores of the subject and includes practical guides and exercises. Other titles include Garden Magic, Altars & Rituals and The Elements.

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